Urban sprawl is a land-use pattern showing dimensions of eight distinct including continuity

Urban sprawl is a land-use pattern showing dimensions of eight distinct including continuity, density, clustering, concentration, mixed uses, centrality, proximity and nuclearity (Shahraki et al., 2011). The industrial revolution is considered as the major cause for rapid growth and expansion of cities during eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. The industrial development between 1750 and 1830 CE converted most of the north-western Europe from rural to large urban centric societies engaged with commerce, factory manufacture and trade (Saravanan and Ilanggovan, 2010).
Although, all major urban areas of the world only occupy less than 0.5 per cent of the world’s total land area but they are the home of half of the world population (United Nation, 2008; European Commission, 2010 and Schneider et al., 2009). Despite the fact of little percent distribution and coverage of land cover of the whole world by the urban areas, they have profound impacts on urban environment such as biodiversity, ecosystem fluxes and environmental quality (Breuste, et al., 1998 and Pickett, et al., 2001).
The criteria of an urban area in South Asia is as any place with a population of more than 5,000 and with a population density of 400 persons per square kilometer and minimum 75% of the population engaged with non-agricultural activities is considered as urban area (Sudhira et al., 2004). Due to fast growing urbanization, South Asian regions are facing many challenges such as slums,v