Throughout history the narrator emphasizes being a balanced person despite the actions he performs demonstrate the opposite to the reader and justifies his obsessions and the extravagance of his way of thinking

Throughout history the narrator emphasizes being a balanced person despite the actions he performs demonstrate the opposite to the reader and justifies his obsessions and the extravagance of his way of thinking, of perceiving reality and to act admitting suffering a disease that has intensified the capacity of all his senses, the ear being his sharpest faculty. It is then when this character begins to show feelings of superiority with respect to the rest of the mortals. This disease makes him feel powerful. In addition, it returns to deny its madness, alleging that it’s so intelligent way to act is not own of the unbalanced ones.
Likewise, he feels so proud of the meticulous method of doing away with the damage that the old man’s eye produces. Besides this presumption of power and ingenuity, he goes even further and says he knows what the old man feels always. But also, his superiority and power reach the highest point when he decides that the time has come when the old man must die. In some way that this whole perverse plan may lead the reader to take him for a madman, he insists again that it is not madness that makes him listen to the heartbeat of the old man, but the supernatural acuity of his ear. After the crime, he returns to demonstrate the precautions with which he hides the evidence of the crime, feeling again proud of the calm and serenity with which he carries out all his plans.