The purpose of this paper is to analyze how the choice between love and honor is settled and portrayed in Game of Thrones and how the themes unfold throughout in the show

The purpose of this paper is to analyze how the choice between love and honor is settled and portrayed in Game of Thrones and how the themes unfold throughout in the show. Reference is given more to the execution of Ned Stark and season 3 episode 5 & 6 where the show gives us bathing scenes of Jon Snow and Ygritte and Jaime Lannister and Brienne of Tarth. The paper is to establish brief focus how the scenes are shown; to depict on some scenes the production and technical aspects as well as on others the emotional or metaphorical content of the scenes. To achieve the analysis I will then show a reflection on the scenes and how they portray dilemma between love and honor.
Firstly, I will use the bath scene of Jamie and Brienne to show the technical and production aspects and how they are used to reflect on love and honor. Jaime gets a bathtub filled with water, and what is the purpose of water? From this point It could be seen as a cleansing liquid which is pure. As he gets in, there’s a long shot were we get the viewing of everything and everyone, the shot is make in a way that sort of leads the viewer to get the feel that they are intruding on Brienne along with Jamie. The scene goes on with the two shown almost at the edges of the frame giving an impression that the two are far apart from each other. In the shots, Brienne seems surprised at the same time horrified that he would come into the same tub as her and she covers up for almost the whole time but Jaime shows her no interest. The scene is done with mostly these two shots of them in the edge of the Frame back and forth as Jaime tells his story and Brienne looks as uncomfortable as ever. During his sort of monlogue, Jamie tests Brienne’s interest by once more bringing Renly’s name up and her response is one that leaves an amusing speechless reaction to Jaime’s abrupt comment. She stands bold, angry, and rather disgusted that Jaime overstep the boundaries in saying what he did. In this scene, we can only see Jaime’s head, it is as if the directors made it to be some sort of blocking obstacle for Brienne’s breasts, making it seem as if Jaime is the only one deserving or fit to see.

The instant the nudity appears it can be said to symbolize openness as Brienne is somehow allowing herself to be open towards Jaime and her own femininity and vulnerably reflects who she is as a woman. Hence the viewers seem to realize the power of her womanhood without the armor, fighting or even killing anyone. In addition, trust is also depicted here; it is through this action that Brienne indirectly shows her trust to Jaime, which can serve as a solidifying moment of their platonic relationship. The scene continues to Jaime having a reflective and revealing moment; He places himself into her care, shows that indeed he trusts her and relies on her just as she relies on him. Both Jaime and Brienne now stay in the shots to show the viewer that somehow you can’t separate the two of them. “What would you do if your precious Renly asked you to bring your father’s head?” Jaime asks as he begins to tells his story, we start with a medium shot, leaving enough lead room to Brienne being all the way to the right of the screen, as he tells Brienne why he is called by the name he despises and why he did such an act.
We get a close-up of him which allows us to get into his personal space as we’ve been trying to understand what made him kill a king. The Jaime who may have known as a multifaceted man who everyone hated deeply is now shown in a way that creates a sense of sympathy towards him because we finally understand what happened. In the final shot he delivers the famous line with such passion at the same time in despair: “By what right does the Wolf judge the Lion?” and it is at this point where he became a “different Jaime”. He is still the same person as before but due to this confession, he can now become a better person and we can feel sympathy towards him. At this point he has become cleansed, the water has served its purpose, and a new Jaime emerges from this whole experience. Moreover here the viewer may be given the idea that the only thing Jamie needs to atone, is his attempt to kill Bran and what he just widely reviled turns out to be something that probably saved the nation. It is here that we are also reminded how war asks difficult questions of people: in this case it asked a young Jaime to choose between his father or love and to break a sacred oath to save a city or his king, and in the end he picked love.