Over the past 20 years

Over the past 20 years, the prevalence of obesity has risen dramatically worldwide. Recent findings show that 52%of Australian women are overweight or obese* including 35% of women aged 25-35 years of age+. As a result of the increase in obesity in these reproductive years, the prevalence of obesity in pregnancy is also rising. Increased complications of labour and delivery are linked to obesity in pregnancy. Maternal obesity has been found to slow cervical dilatation and increase the risk of prolonged labour. Obese pregnant women have higher rates of medical interventions around labour and birth including higher rates of induction for prolonged pregnancy and higher rates of Caesarean section as a result of failure to progress in labour.
About 30% of young Australian women are obese. Obese pregnant women have higher rates of medical interventions during labour, induction for prolonged pregnancy, Caesarean delivery as a result of failure to progress in labour, and longer bed stays, with significant implications for service delivery. This project aims to better understand mechanisms whereby obesity results in ineffective labour, and to determine whether lipid modification or omega-3 fatty acid supplementation improve outcomes.
Obesity during pregnancy puts you at risk of several serious health problems: Gestational diabetes is diabetes that is first diagnosed during pregnancy. This condition can increase the risk of having a cesarean delivery. … Preeclampsia is a high blood pressure disorder that can occur during pregnancy or after pregnancy.